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Nat'l Weather Service Says "Atmospheric River" Headed For Us, Could Mean 2-3" (Or More) Of Rain For LB, Heavy With Rates At Times Of Roughly 1" Per Hour; See NWS Text, Make Prudent Preparations


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(Feb. 16, 2017) -- The National Weather Service text below, issued before dawn today (Feb. 16), speaks for itself:

A long narrow band of subtropical moisture, otherwise known as an Atmospheric River will take aim at Southwestern California. Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties should take the brunt of this powerful storm Friday morning through Saturday morning.

Between 2 to 6 inches of rainfall is expected across coast and valleys...

Rainfall rates are expected to reach one inch per hour. With this storm system expected to be slow in moving through the forecast area, there will be several potential hydrological impacts. The potential for widespread flooding and flash flooding is a definite threat. Not just for the recent burn areas, but anywhere there is the potential for flooding.

A National Weather Service graphic below (updated Feb. 16) suggests Long Beach may avoid the worst of it, but there's no guarantee of this; we generally hope for the best but prepare for the worst.

[Scroll down for further.]





Below is the latest flood watch and hydrologic text from the National Weather Service:

Flood Watch
254 AM PST Thu Feb 16 2017

...Heavy rain expected across much of southwest California Friday through early Saturday...

The first wave of rain will...move south into Los Angeles and Ventura Counties tonight. The second wave arriving Friday morning...Strong southerly winds combined with ample moisture will lead to periods of very heavy rain with rain rates at times around 1 inch per hour. Rainfall will begin to taper off Saturday morning with the flash flood threat ending around noon,

* From Friday morning through Saturday morning:

* Periods of heavy rain with rainfall rates up to 1 inch per hour at times. Projected rainfall totals through Saturday morning are expected to range between 3 and 6 inches across coast and valleys with 5 to 10 inches possible in favored foothill and mountain locations. Heaviest rainfall amounts expected along south facing slopes from the Santa Ynez Range east through the San Gabriels.

* [T]here will likely be widespread urban roadway flooding, along with potential flooding of small streams and creeks...

Hydrologic Outlook

626 AM PST Thu Feb 16 2017

...A major storm system will affect Southwest California tonight through Saturday resulting in flooding concerns...

A long narrow band of subtropical moisture, otherwise known as an Atmospheric River will take aim at Southwestern California. Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties should take the brunt of this powerful storm Friday morning through Saturday morning.

Between 2 to 6 inches of rainfall is expected across coast and valleys, with between 5 to 10 inches across the Santa Ynez Range, as well as the Ventura and Los Angeles County Mountains.

Rainfall rates are expected to reach one inch per hour. With this storm system expected to be slow in moving through the forecast area, there will be several potential hydrological impacts. The potential for widespread flooding and flash flooding is a definite threat. Not just for the recent burn areas, but anywhere there is the potential for flooding.

The expected high rainfall amounts and intensities could bring numerous hydrological impacts. Many rivers and streams could see significant flows on Friday into Saturday...but main-stem river flooding is not expected at this time. There is a potential for swift water rescues due to the heavy rain and resulting increased flow rates. There will be the threat of flash flooding with mud and debris flows in and around the recent burn areas, especially with Friday;s storm. Also, widespread and significant urban and small stream flooding can be expected at times through Monday. Lastly rock and mudslides will be a significant threat during this period, especially across canyon roads.

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The City of Long Beach has sand and sandbags available (caveat: City Hall says "bring your own shovel or tool when collecting sand."):

[Sand and Sandbags

Sand is currently available at the Long Beach Public Works/Public Service Yard, 1651 San Francisco Avenue, at the Esther Street Gate. Sand and sand bags are available at the following Long Beach Fire Stations:

  • Station 7, 2295 Elm Street
  • Station 12, 1199 Artesia (Artesia and Orange)
  • Station 13, 2475 Adriatic Ave
  • Station 14, 5200 Eliot St

Sand is also available near the Granada and Claremont launch ramps along Ocean Boulevard.

Sand Bags are available at all neighborhood Fire Stations. Fire crews may not always be available at stations if they are on calls for service. Sand Bags are available at the Lifeguard Station at 72nd Place, 7200 East Ocean Boulevard; and Lifeguard Beach Operations, 2100 East Ocean Boulevard.

Residents are advised to bring their own shovel or tool when collecting sand.

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LBREPORT.com will have in-motion NWS Doppler Radar on our front page (www.LBREPORT.com) along with continuing coverage. Feel free to share your photos and videos with our readers at mail@LBReport.com, or our Facebook page or text them to (562) 818-7651. Please include the location and date and time...and always stay safe yourself.

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