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LB City Prosecutor Haubert Will Offer Peaceful Protestors Cited For Curfew Violations Opportunity For Teachable Moment Discussion...But Loooters/Vandals Should Expect Criminal Charges


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(June 9, 2020, 9:10 p.m.) --LB City Prosecutor Doug Haubert has announced an initiative to deal with peaceful protestors cited for curfew violations. His office plans to turn the experience into a teachable moment by nviting those cited for curfew violations -- while participating in peaceful protests -- to participate in a dialogue on what took place.

At the same time, Mr. Haubert said that program wouldn't apply to those who weren't peacefully protesting. "The few people who used the peacerful protest as an opportunity to steal and vandalize, or who intentionally put other peoples' lives in harm's way, should expect criminal charges," Mr. Haubert said.

LBREPORY.com publishes City Prosecutor Haubert's statement in full below:

[June 9 City Prosecutor statement] The City Prosecutorís Office has not yet received the citations. After we review the cases we should have a clearer view of each personís conduct.

However, from the onset it is clear than many of those cited for curfew violations were attempting to exercise their free speech rights, and they were doing so in a nonviolent way. The frustration and outrage they showed over the death of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer is more than justified.

My office has decided to try something unique, something that weíve have not done before and something we hope will improve relations between law enforcement and the community. I intend to invite those cited to participate in a dialogue on this important subject. This could become a teachable moment, not just for protesters and those in law enforcement, but for all of us. I have consulted with some community members about the idea, and Iíve reached out to two educators who I respect very much, Long Beach Unified School Board President Dr. Felton Williams and CSULB President Jane Close Conoley. I hope to partner with them and possibly others on a framework over the next few weeks.

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As most people know, Long Beach has already done a lot of creative work to improve the criminal justice system, from establishing a Justice Lab to reduce the cycle of incarceration to creating innovative prosecutor-led court diversion programs like Promising Adults, Tomorrowís Hope (PATH). But there is so much more work we need to do. As long as people are protesting peacefully I do not believe the interest of justice would be served by criminal prosecution, and creating a platform for dialogue seems like the best way to bend the arc of the moral universe towards justice.

As for those who were not peacefully protesting, this program would not apply. The few people who used the peaceful protest as an opportunity to steal and vandalize, or who intentionally put other peoplesí lives in harmís way, should expect criminal charges. Again, we have not received the cases yet, so any determination on the kind of charges, if any, will need to be made at a later time.

Every single person in the City Prosecutorís Office was horrified by what we saw in Minneapolis. Here, I can assure you, Black Lives Matter. So does justice, so does the First Amendment.

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Support really independent news in Long Beach. No one in LBREPORT.com's ownership, reporting or editorial decision-making has ties to development interests, advocacy groups or other special interests; or is seeking or receiving benefits of City development-related decisions; or holds a City Hall appointive position; or has contributed sums to political campaigns for Long Beach incumbents or challengers. LBREPORT.com isn't part of an out of town corporate cluster and no one its ownership, editorial or publishing decisionmaking has been part of the governing board of any City government body or other entity on whose policies we report. LBREPORT.com is reader and advertiser supported. You can help keep really independent news in LB similar to the way people support NPR and PBS stations. We're not non-profit so it's not tax deductible but $49.95 (less than an annual dollar a week) helps keep us online.


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